Home improvement contractors by law, must give the buyer a “Notice of Consumer’s Right to Receive Lien Waivers” before the buyer and seller enter into a home improvement contract. The notice shall inform the buyer, that the buyer may request lien waivers from all contractors, subcontractors, and material suppliers at, or prior to, the time any payment is made on the home improvement contract.
That’s a great point to design with the future in mind, especially for people who are looking to put their home up for sale within the next few years. We are actually doing a renovation so that our home will be worth more when we sell, so that tip is for us. I think we might try consulting with a bathroom remodel specialist because they would know what trends are here to stay for the next few years—at least long enough for us to sell our home. Thanks for the info!
Great blog site – I have a quick question that I hope you won’t mind answering. I just got our 2013 Kodiak travel trailer back from having the roof replaced (western US sun-destruction). The manufacturer didn’t install the front cap correctly at point of manufacture, so long story short, it is correct now, but the interior wall-panel behind our bedroom cabinets is screwy. I’m thinking the same way your write-up describes, why bother putting back the cheap garbage (?).
For most people, their home is their single largest investment, so treat it that way. Hire a financial planner to work out a strategy for protecting your investment by analyzing all of the financing options that are available. A financial whiz can tell you if you should refinance to lower your monthly payments or pull out some equity to pay for value-adding improvements.

For those who are thinking of putting their home up for sale five years from now, then it’s important to ensure that the value of your property would increase over time, consider having your home renovated for that purpose. On the other hand, if you’re planning to live in your home for a couple of years, it’s very important to ensure that the design of your bathroom is something you would really love and fit with your style and preferences.

Hi Ashley, I’m a 23 year old looking to reno a trailer with my partner to live in full time. Pinterest and Instagram lead me here because I love what you’ve done with your space. Can I ask what type of trailer you remodelled? and approximately how much money and time did you spent on renos? We can’t decide whether to gut a trailer and rebuild like you have or whether it’s easier/cheaper to paint cabniets, walls and redo floors in the layout that we buy it.
I like that you talked about how you must consider having a little extra for the budget in bathroom remodeling because there can be unexpected problems that can affect the cost of the project. My husband and I are interested to remodel our bathroom to give it a newer look. We’ve been talking about the factors that we should consider in setting a budget for it since we want everything planned accordingly. With that being said, I’ll make sure to consider having a little extra for the budget. Thanks!
Dear Debbie: Tipping isn’t the standard in the home services trades, as it is in the restaurant and personal grooming trades. Still, it’s a question many homeowners wrestle with. To help answer it, Angie’s List recently polled nearly 5,000 home service professionals across the nation to find out if they expect a tip and if so, what they tend to collect.
Replacing the cracked concrete surfaces around your home can cost a small fortune. But for a fraction of that cost, concrete can be resurfaced in a multitude of colors and finishes. Consider adding a cobblestone finish to your driveway, a brick look to an old walkway or a slate finish around the pool or patio. Whichever texture you choose, it will be a huge improvement over standard concrete and potential homebuyers will really take notice.

Want to save some big bucks remodeling your bathroom? Consider refinishing existing items such as your bathtub, shower, sink or tile. With refinishing, you’ll only pay a small fraction (as little as 10 percent) of the cost of replacement. Your bathroom won’t be torn up for weeks, you'll avoid the big renovation mess and you’ve put one less big ol’ tub in the landfill
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